Chrysanthemum – Chrysanthemum morifolium

One of the most common flowers found in the fall is the Chrysanthemum. It adds a bright, cheerfulness when everything else is fading away, awaiting the approach of winter.

 

Native to China and Japan the hybrid of garden origin is happiest in a well-drained, sunny location. In its native Orient it has been used for thousands of years as an herbal medicine to reduce fever and the feverish discomforts of colds and headaches, this cooling herb will also help to reduce inflammation. It is an old and reliable tonic for good eye health, relieving strain, night blindness and sore, tired eyes. In the East they have been valued in herbal medicine as a bitter, aromatic herb that cools the body since at least the first century A.D. The Chinese always steamed the flowers before drying to reduce bitterness, and they made a tea as a cooling and refreshing summer drink

Chrysanthemum is believed to support good coronary health. It is thought to promote healthy blood pressure levels, dilate the coronary arteries, and increase blood flow to the heart. The flower has been used to relieve hypertension and is said to be helpful in cases of angina.

It is also used as a food source: the flower heads are pickled in vinegar. An aromatic tea is made from the leaves. A tangy aromatic tea is made from the flowers or flower petals. For a sweeter tea only the petals are used.

The flower heads or petals can also be parboiled and served as a salad with tofu and seasoned with vinegar or soy sauce. They can also be prepared as tempura, pickled, dried, or added to soups.

It is Japan’s National flower and is associated with November.

Tea Recipe

Ingredients

10 – 20 Golden Chrysanthemum flowers

1 – 3 teaspoon of honey

3 cups (850ml) of water

Instructions

Wash and drain chrysanthemum flowers.

Add 10 – 20 yellow chrysanthemum flowers into teapot.

Add 1 – 3 teaspoon of honey

Pour boiling water into pot.

Allow tea to stand for 5 – 10 minutes.

Pour tea into cup and allow to cool slightly before drinking.

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