Tobacco – Nicotiana tabacum

Tobacco is a native of the warmer parts of America, and was first exported to England, in 1586, by Sir Walter Raleigh. According to the authors of the Pharmacographia, it was carried to Europe by the Spaniards on their return from ‘discovering’* America in1492, and employed for its medicinal effects.

 Tobacco has a long history of use by medical herbalists as a relaxant, though since it is a highly additive drug it is seldom employed internally or externally at present.

Most importantly Tobacco is one of the 4 sacred plants of the Native American Indians. It is used to communicate with Creator, to show respect and humility, to cleanse spiritually and to smoke in the sacred pipe.

Tobacco Plant

Tobacco

 

* There is a question this author has about said ‘discovery’…how does one discover a place that was already well known to its inhabitants, and was never lost or misplaced? The choice of wording on many historians’ parts is ill considered, in my opinion!

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4 responses to this post.

  1. Hi there Herb Rowe! It would be great if one of your sharing options was “press this” (from wordpress). I would love to repost some of your blogs on my herbal blog (http://spiraeaherbs.wordpress.com/). Thanks for the great information!

    Reply

  2. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Correne Omland, Karol Rowe. Karol Rowe said: Tobacco – Nicotiana tabacum: http://wp.me/p10ty0-6t […]

    Reply

  3. Hi Spiraeaherbs….made a few changes, hope they help

    Thanks for the compliment! :o))

    Reply

  4. […] October 25, 2010 by spiraeaherbs Tobacco is a native of the warmer parts of America, and was first exported to England, in 1586, by Sir Walter Raleigh. According to the authors of the Pharmacographia, it was carried to Europe by the Spaniards on their return from ‘discovering’* America in1492, and employed for its medicinal effects.  Tobacco has a long history of use by medical herbalists as a relaxant, though since it is a highly additive drug it is seldom employed internally o … Read More […]

    Reply

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